WRONGFUL DEATH

Chicago Wrongful Death Lawyer

We can lose a loved one as a result of many kinds of negligence -— medical malpractice, dangerous products, automobile negligence, and other negligent conduct.

If you or your family has lost a loved one, then the attorneys at Lloyd Law Group, Ltd. can help you recover the compensation you will need to recover from your loss. We handle various types of wrongful death claims arising from cancer misdiagnosis, birth injury, surgical errors, hospital or nursing errors and more.

Morris v. University of Chicago Hospitals $8 Million Settlement

Valerie Morris had surgery to remove an abdominal abscess. After surgery, she developed swelling in both of her legs. The next day Valerie was found in cardiac arrest on the floor of her hospital room. Despite resuscitation, Valerie suffered brain damage and lived in a vegetative state for many years before she died.

After many attorneys had declined the case, Plaintiff’s counsel Kurt Lloyd was asked to investigate the cause of Valerie’s arrest. The cause of the arrest was still considered unknown at the time of her death. The PRG test had not been used by physicians since 1985. After research, Plaintiff’s counsel retained the vascular surgeon who had invented the PRG test. This surgeon reviewed the PRG test and concluded that it had been misinterpreted as negative. Instead, the test demonstrated evidence of a blood clot (“DVT”) in Valerie’s large veins, near the site of her original surgery, which had broke off and traveled to her heart.

At the time of settlement, this was the largest wrongful death settlement for a medical malpractice case that had ever been obtained in Illinois.

Estate of Moore v. Wrona, M.D. $2.475 Million Settlement

This maternal death case arose as a result of a necrotizing fasciitis infection to the mother’s episiotomy wound which was contracted at the time of delivery of her first child. The obstetrician repaired the wound and ordered a narcotic medication for pain in the mother’s wound. However, despite continued pain in her wound and an increased white blood cell count two days after delivery, the obstetrician discharged the mother home. This single mother, age twenty, was re-admitted to the hospital four days later with an advanced infection in her body. The plaintiff’s obstetrical expert with a specialty in maternal infections testified to the negligence of the defendant and demonstrated that, even though the overall death rate for this infection was 70%, the mother should have survived with timely diagnosis and treatment. Based on national statistics, Plaintiff’s counsel Kurt Lloyd obtained a rare victory among maternal wound infection cases.

Estate of Greenblatt v. Poor, M.D. $1.195 Million Jury Verdict

This was a delay in diagnosis of lung cancer case representing one of the few jury verdicts recorded in favor of the plaintiff. This verdict is also noteworthy for being in excess of one million dollars for the wrongful death of a widowed woman over the age of sixty-five.

Plaintiff’s counsel Kurt Lloyd retained one of the world’s leading lung cancer surgeons, who testified that a person with a malignant lung tumor less than 3.0 cm in size has a seventy percent chance of survival with timely diagnosis and treatment.

Estate of Lucas v. Roper, M.D. $1 Million Settlement

A surviving widow and her two children filed a wrongful death case against a surgeon for not doing a timely exploratory surgery to determine the cause of the patient’s diarrhea, cramping, and lower abdominal pain for past three days. The defendant claimed that he delayed the surgery, because the patient weighed 350 pounds making him to large for abdominal CT-scan to be performed and refused surgery, but no documentation of a refusal to accept medical treatment against medical advice was charted. The patient died of peritonitis which had resulted from an undiagnosed perforation to his bowel. The defendant only had a $1 million insurance policy.

Estate of Lucas v. Roper, M.D. $1,000,000

The plaintiff’s estate sued defendant surgeon for the failure to timely perform an exploratory surgery to determine the cause of the patient’s diarrhea, cramping, and lower abdominal pain for past three days. The defendant claimed he could not obtain an abdominal CT scan, because the patient weighed 350 pounds making him to large for abdominal CT-scan and that the patient had refused surgery, but no documentation of a refusal to accept medical treatment against medical advice was charted. The patient died of peritonitis which had resulted from a delayed diagnosis of a perforated bowel.

Estate of Moore v. Wrona, MD and St. Joseph’s Medical Center $2,475,000

This maternal death case arose as a result of a necrotizing fasciitis infection to the mother’s episiotomy and laceration wound which was contracted at the time of delivery.

The plaintiff’s counsel retained an obstetrical expert with a specialty in maternal infections who testified to the negligence of the defendants and demonstrated that, even though the death rate for this infection was 70%, Melinda should have survived with timely, appropriate treatment.

Estate of Barksdale v. Horowitz, DDS $1,000,000 (policy limit)

The plaintiff’s mother filed a wrongful death case against an oral surgeon for the loss of her twenty-year-old daughter who died from a cardio-respiratory arrest after extraction of a wisdom tooth under anesthesia. The plaintiff alleged that the oral surgeon terminated recovery room monitoring before the patient had sufficiently awakened after conscious sedation.

This case has resulted in more vigilant monitoring of anesthesia patients in dental offices.

Estate of Urbanski v. Lerner, MD $1,500,000

The plaintiff sued for the wrongful death of his wife Patricia, alleging that she died from a delay in diagnosis of breast cancer, because the defendant internist failed to recommend routine annual screening mammograms to her after her fiftieth birthday.

Estate of Thomas, deceased v. Advocate Christ Hospital and Medical Center $1,000,000

The deceased plaintiff, age 65 and obese, was admitted for hernia surgery. Nursing staff did not follow procedures for pre-operative and post-operative assessment of the plaintiff for risk of venous thromboembolism (‘blood clots”) and notify physicians, which resulted in a delay in heparin drug prevention. The plaintiff died one day after discharge home from a large saddle pulmonary embolism. The plaintiff had history of Stage III colon cancer with risk of recurrence at time of death.